Developing new materials for thermal energy storage

Dr Daniel Strosnider, Strategy & Sustainability director at the Aberla Group, took part in a discussion alongside the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, National Grid, the Energy Institute and others, with topics ranging from sustainable growth to employability.

The energy panel, hosted by Lancaster University, sought to unpack market developments and provide an understanding of the general energy industry with a view to encourage students to make careers in the energy industry.

The main body of discussion surrounded the possibility of sustainable growth, whether this was possible in the current environmental and economic climate. Whilst the panel moved in a direction to acknowledge the forms of negative growth that pervade the market, Aberla brought the conversation to the forms of positive growth that abound in the market, highlighting the work of the Company with Local Authorities and housing associations, whose positive work in reducing emissions and energy consumption held a direct correlation with a healthy market.

Another element of the discussion pertained to the academic viability and industry relevance of a potential energy management degree. Aberla’s Daniel Strosnider presented that the viability of such studies would lie in close links with industry and practical applications, positing that industry exposure in the energy sector is more beneficial than academic research.

Aberla’s top tip for students was to be flexible, motivated and to understand that the energy industry is varied and touches every sector.

Dr Daniel Strosnider, Strategy & Sustainability director at the Aberla Group, took part in a discussion alongside the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, National Grid, the Energy Institute and others, with topics ranging from sustainable growth to employability.

The energy panel, hosted by Lancaster University, sought to unpack market developments and provide an understanding of the general energy industry with a view to encourage students to make careers in the energy industry.

The main body of discussion surrounded the possibility of sustainable growth, whether this was possible in the current environmental and economic climate. Whilst the panel moved in a direction to acknowledge the forms of negative growth that pervade the market, Aberla brought the conversation to the forms of positive growth that abound in the market, highlighting the work of the Company with Local Authorities and housing associations, whose positive work in reducing emissions and energy consumption held a direct correlation with a healthy market.

Another element of the discussion pertained to the academic viability and industry relevance of a potential energy management degree. Aberla’s Daniel Strosnider presented that the viability of such studies would lie in close links with industry and practical applications, positing that industry exposure in the energy sector is more beneficial than academic research.

Aberla’s top tip for students was to be flexible, motivated and to understand that the energy industry is varied and touches every sector.