Developing new materials for thermal energy storage

The Aberla Group’s Research and Innovation Centre is supporting Aston University in a bid for Innovate UK funding, pursuing the development of agile thermal energy storage using graphene. If successful, the material developed has the potential to play an important role in the decarbonisation of domestic and commercial heating systems.

The study is seeking to harness increase the efficiency of thermal energy storage, positing that thermal energy storage can play an indispensable role in facilitating the widespread electrification of heat in the UK. Thermal heating provides a load shifting capability which can enable peak demand shaving and enables the operation of small heat pumps at maximum efficiency. The study posits that widespread implementation of thermal energy storage will result in 70% bill reduction in typical UK homes.

The overall aim of the project is to contribute to the decarbonisation of low-temperature heat and therefore support the UK’s net-zero ambitions.

The study will demonstrate how integrating thermal energy storage with electric heat pumps and solar thermal collectors can achieve a yearly energy consumption and CO2 emissions of 56% and 70% respectively.

The Aberla Group’s Research and Innovation Centre is supporting Aston University in a bid for Innovate UK funding, pursuing the development of agile thermal energy storage using graphene. If successful, the material developed has the potential to play an important role in the decarbonisation of domestic and commercial heating systems.

The study is seeking to harness increase the efficiency of thermal energy storage, positing that thermal energy storage can play an indispensable role in facilitating the widespread electrification of heat in the UK. Thermal heating provides a load shifting capability which can enable peak demand shaving and enables the operation of small heat pumps at maximum efficiency. The study posits that widespread implementation of thermal energy storage will result in 70% bill reduction in typical UK homes.

The overall aim of the project is to contribute to the decarbonisation of low-temperature heat and therefore support the UK’s net-zero ambitions.

The study will demonstrate how integrating thermal energy storage with electric heat pumps and solar thermal collectors can achieve a yearly energy consumption and CO2 emissions of 56% and 70% respectively.